TELELHOUSE TUTELAGE: PEERING 101

Understanding Network Interconnectivity

Peering, simply defined, is the interconnection of two different networks, allowing them to directly exchange traffic between one another, and organizations to reach each other’s customers. Public peering is performed across a shared network and relies upon Internet Exchanges (IXs) to function and deliver content across the world. An Internet Exchange is an Ethernet switch or set of Ethernet switches in a colocation facility, to which all networks peering in the facility can connect. Using an IX, a network can cost-effectively peer with hundreds of other networks through a single connection.

Private peering within a colocation facility involves two networks putting routers in the same building and running a direct cable between them rather than connecting via the exchange point switch. This is common when the networks are exchanging a large volume of traffic that won’t fit on a shared connection to an exchange point.

Most major population centers have an Internet Exchange. Because of the significant network density available in these key locations, a variety of businesses, including cloud and content providers, financial services companies, global enterprises and public sector agencies choose to deploy their infrastructure within these facilities. This allows them to leverage the direct interconnection options available by cross-connecting with multiple network providers. Peering arrangements need to be negotiated with each peer, but no new cabling needs to be deployed, unlike private peering. Click here to read more…

Contact Details:
Telehouse America
7 Teleport Drive,
Staten Island,
New York, USA 10311
Phone No: 718–355–2500
Email: gregory.grant@telehouse.com

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